Last updated: July 04. 2014 7:41PM - 641 Views
By - gbudzak@civitasmedia.com - 740-413-0904



Blue Limestone Lake is a feature of Blue Limestone Park. The City of Delaware will make improvements to the park that will reduce the need for dredging the quarry lake.
Blue Limestone Lake is a feature of Blue Limestone Park. The City of Delaware will make improvements to the park that will reduce the need for dredging the quarry lake.
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By Gary Budzak


gbudzak@civitasmedia.com


The City of Delaware soon will begin work on stream and wetland improvements at Blue Limestone Park, thanks to a grant from the Ohio EPA.


“The grant is to help pay for the installation of over 24,000 square foot of permeable concrete pavement in the existing parking lot at Blue Limestone, and the reconstruction and restoration of 3.9 acres of bio-retention and bio-swale areas around the parking lot,” Director of Public Utilities Brad Stanton said July 1 at the Public Works/Public Utilities Committee.


The city received a grant of $186,534 grant from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency earlier this year. The construction cost of $310,890 will be funded by the grant and $124,356 from the Storm Sewer Fund.


The project is currently being designed by Kleingers Group and will soon go out for construction bids. Construction is expected to start on Aug. 1 and be completed by Oct. 30. The park will remain open during the project, Stanton said.


“The pavement will allow the stormwater to drain, go through layers of concrete, treat the suspended solids and filter out any pollutants before it goes on to the quarry lake or Delaware Run,” Stanton said.


Blue Limestone, one of the city’s oldest parks, receives surface water runoff containing sediments in the lake and the run, which is a tributary of the Olentangy River. The sediment leads to poor water quality and requires expensive dredging. According to the city, the pervious pavement will reduce “sediment by 0.3 tons per year” and “reduce the need for dredging.”


Stanton said park areas will be converted into bio-swales and bio-retention zones to improve runoff.


In addition, stream corridor restoration will take place at Delaware Run, expanding narrow areas to slow water runoff and filter the sediment caused by flooding.


The city recently held an open house to discuss the project.


Gary Budzak may be reached at 740-413-0904 or on Twitter @GaryBudzak.

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