Delaware City Council approves testing at water plant, upgrades to railroad crossings


By Gary Budzak - gbudzak@civitasmedia.com



Some of the membrane filters used at the city’s water treatment plant. City Council recently approved additional funding for cyanotoxin testing equipment at the plant.

Some of the membrane filters used at the city’s water treatment plant. City Council recently approved additional funding for cyanotoxin testing equipment at the plant.


Gary Budzak | The Gazette

Delaware City Council recently approved testing equipment for the city’s water treatment plant and upgrades at a couple of railroad crossings.

Council approved a $30,000 grant agreement with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency for cyanotoxin testing equipment at the water treatment plant. The OEPA made the funds available to test drinking water for harmful algae blooms (cyanobacteria).

The CSX rail crossing at London Road will receive $40,000 in upgrades using rubberized materials surrounding the rails in November. However, council removed language from the legislation calling for similar upgrades at Pennsylvania Avenue. The last time improvements were made at the crossings were in 2009.

Council approved the ability to assess Sam Dong and International Paper for improving the road at the rail crossing across Pittsburgh Drive. The city will spend up to $125,000 to reconstruct the pavement approaches up to the crossing on both sides, but the companies (which receive shipments on the railroad) would “be responsible for maintaining the base, base drainage, rail crossing lines, and pavement between the rail crossing lines,” states the legislation.

Also at the past two council meetings:

  • Council approved the purchase of two properties on Central Avenue at Channing Street. Council was told the homes don’t look bad on the outside, but “the properties have deteriorated to the point where the Building Department believes that they are a hazard and should be demolished,” states the legislation. “These purchases allow the city to ensure the safety of the neighborhood now and allow the city to realign the intersection in the future.”
  • Upon the advice of city attorney Darren Shulman, council has also agreed not to change its ordinances regarding the number of dogs a resident may have, despite a resident’s request. “No household shall be permitted to own or board more than three dogs that are 10 weeks of age or older on the premises of the household,” reads a city ordinance which was passed in 1977.
  • Council approved a resolution accepting $167,112 in water distribution and sanitary sewer improvements at Glenross Golf Club’s Enclave subdivision by Pulte Homes of Ohio LLC.
  • Due to a resident’s request, a “No Parking Here to Corner” sign would be moved from 91 feet to 65 feet south of Griswold Street.
  • During a public comment session, Paul Olen of the Shade Tree Commission spoke of eradicating “alien invasive species” in the city, such as honeysuckle bushes. Council will take up the matter at a future meeting.
  • Council member Joe DiGenova mentioned a telephone scam that is once again making its rounds — a request for money from the IRS. DiGenova said he reported the caller to the Attorney General’s Office.

Some of the membrane filters used at the city’s water treatment plant. City Council recently approved additional funding for cyanotoxin testing equipment at the plant.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/40/2015/10/web1_DSCF5056.jpgSome of the membrane filters used at the city’s water treatment plant. City Council recently approved additional funding for cyanotoxin testing equipment at the plant.

Gary Budzak | The Gazette

By Gary Budzak

gbudzak@civitasmedia.com

Gary Budzak may be reached at 740-413-0904 or on Twitter @GaryBudzak.

Gary Budzak may be reached at 740-413-0904 or on Twitter @GaryBudzak.