Registration tax approved in Powell


By Sophia Englehart - For The Gazette



Following debates on a number of topics Tuesday, Powell City Council managed to successfully discuss and pass three ordinances, one of which adds a $5 yearly tax on all motor vehicles registered within the city.

At the beginning of the meeting, Mayor Jon Bennehoof called forward the representatives for the Age Friendly Assessment.

This project, which is a health survey developed by the Delaware General Health District and nonprofit SourcePoint, analyzes and studies the satisfaction rates in local township matters. Participants were asked a variety of questions about multiple topics, including retirement, railroad crossing signs, intergenerational activities and health services, to name a few.

As expected, many of the residents were satisfied with their lives in Delaware County, but wouldn’t choose to live out their retirement here due to the high standard of living.

“A large percentage of people are either unsure or are definitely worried about supporting themselves throughout retirement,” said Abby Crisp, an epidemiologist with the Delaware General Health District. “It boils down to the fact that, Delaware County is a great place to live, but only for those who can afford it.”

Council also moved to deliberate the more recent items on the city agenda, which included the issuing of permits for local massage parlors before continuing on to the three ordinances.

The discussion and passing of Ordinance 2019-28, which proposed an additional yearly $5 tax on all motor vehicles registered within the city, was met with some dissent. Council members Daniel Swartout and Brian Lorenz objected to the ruling, saying that the tax was “not necessary for Powell” and could lead to future problems in the city’s financial structure.

City Manager Steve Lutz said during a previous meeting that Powell has approximately 12,500 vehicles registered within the city, which would mean an additional $62,000 for the city. Per the Ohio Revised Code, the monies collected from the tax can only be used for costs associated with public roads, highways, bridges and traffic signs.

“This tax is going to generate approximately $62,000 per year, which doesn’t meet any real needs for the city,” Swartout said. “The Powell Citizens Task Force recognized a $2 million need per year. This tax only covers 3% of what Powell really needs financially.”

Though council went on to vote this tax into passing, the tax will only be paid yearly and applies only to vehicles registered within Powell.

Council went on to unanimously passed Resolution 2019-09, which okayed the property behind the Daily Growler to be installed with a fenced-in bocce ball court. Ordinance 2019-29, a motion that finalized the purchase and construction of the new office for Buckeye House Painting on 204 E. Liberty St., also passed with flying colors.

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By Sophia Englehart

For The Gazette

Sophia Englehart, an Olentangy Liberty High School graduate, is an intern for The Delaware Gazette. She is majoring in journalism at Ohio University.

Sophia Englehart, an Olentangy Liberty High School graduate, is an intern for The Delaware Gazette. She is majoring in journalism at Ohio University.