DCDL to reopen community meeting rooms


By Nicole Fowles - Glad You Asked



It’s one of the final pieces of the puzzle, as we reassemble ourselves from the impact of COVID-19 at the Delaware County District Library: community meeting rooms and bookable spaces.

Three of our library locations – Delaware, Orange and Ostrander – have publicly-available meeting spaces for larger group gatherings. Unfortunately, when we needed more space to quarantine materials and created new workspaces for staff to appropriately social distance, these larger rooms were the first to be repurposed.

Now that we are preparing for the return of in-person programming in the fall — we have stopped quarantining materials, and our staff are returning to the original workspaces — these rooms can be used for what they were originally intended – gatherings!

Most frequently, these are the places where you’ll meet for book groups, storytimes, and other popular library-sponsored programs. However, we also make these rooms available for the public to reserve on a limited basis for both public and private meetings.

We’re proud to make the rooms available for outside organizations like the Delaware chapter of Toastmasters International and the Next Chapter Book Club, a unique, community-based book club for adolescents and adults with Down syndrome, autism, cerebral palsy, and other intellectual and developmental disabilities.

We’ve also had our community rooms reserved by groups like home owners associations, hosting their annual meeting, or local employers who need a place to facilitate a one-time job fair or hiring event.

These rooms are free for the public to use, and we’re proud to provide this much-needed service to the community and our DCDL cardholders.

Our adult book clubs tend to read some of the most popular fiction and nonfiction titles of the day. Today’s list of books comes from the July 25 edition of the New York Times hardcover fiction bestsellers. See if any of these are the right match for you.

• “The Paper Palace” by Miranda Cowley Heller. After an extramarital dalliance, Elle must choose between her husband and her childhood love.

• “Falling” by T. J. Newman. A kidnapper demands that a pilot crash his plane with 144 passengers onboard to save his family.

• “Nine Lives” by Danielle Steel. After tragedy upsets her stable family life, Maggie must decide if she will take a risk with a thrill seeker.

• “The Last Thing He Told Me” by Laura Dave. Hannah Hall discovers truths about her missing husband and bonds with his daughter from a previous relationship.

• “Malibu Rising” by Taylor Jenkins Reid. An epic party has serious outcomes for four famous siblings.

• “The President’s Daughter: A Thriller” by Bill Clinton and James Patterson. Matthew Keating, a past president and former Navy SEAL, goes on his own to find his abducted teenage daughter.

• “The Midnight Library” by Matt Haig. Nora Seed finds a library beyond the edge of the universe that contains books with multiple possibilities of the lives one could have lived.

• “Golden Girl” by Elin Hilderbrand. A Nantucket novelist gets one final summer to watch what happens from the great beyond.

• “The Maidens” by Alex Michaelides. A therapist suspects a Greek tragedy professor at Cambridge University of committing murder.

• “Razorblade Tears” by S. A. Cosby. Two ex-cons must overcome their prejudices about their sons, who were married to each other, to team up and exact revenge on whoever murdered them.

• “The Four Winds” by Kristin Hannah. As dust storms roll during the Great Depression, Elsa must choose between saving the family and farm or heading West.

• “Project Hail Mary” by Andy Weir. Ryland Grace awakes from a long sleep alone and far from home, and the fate of humanity rests on his shoulders.

• “Sooley” by John Grisham. Samuel Sooleymon receives a basketball scholarship to North Carolina Central and determines to bring his family over from a civil war-ravaged South Sudan.

• “The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue” by V.E. Schwab. A Faustian bargain comes with a curse that affects the adventure Addie LaRue has across centuries.

• “The Personal Librarian” by Marie Benedict and Victoria Christopher Murray. A Black woman who becomes one of the most powerful people in the art and book world is forced to hide her true identity.

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By Nicole Fowles

Glad You Asked

If you have a question that you would like to see answered in this column, mail it to Nicole Fowles, Delaware County District Library, 84 E. Winter St., Delaware, OH 43015, or call us at 740-362-3861. You can also email your questions by visiting the library’s web site at www.delawarelibrary.org or directly to Nicole at nfowles@delawarelibrary.org. No matter how you contact us, we’re always glad you asked!

If you have a question that you would like to see answered in this column, mail it to Nicole Fowles, Delaware County District Library, 84 E. Winter St., Delaware, OH 43015, or call us at 740-362-3861. You can also email your questions by visiting the library’s web site at www.delawarelibrary.org or directly to Nicole at nfowles@delawarelibrary.org. No matter how you contact us, we’re always glad you asked!