City’s proposed CIP detailed


Plan highlights several infrastructure projects

By Dillon Davis - cdavis@aimmediamidwest.com



Pictured is the Springfield Branch U.S. 23 Bridge (pedestrian only) with Ohio Wesleyan University’s Selby Stadium visible in the background. In the proposed City of Delaware’s 2019-2023 Capital Improvement Plan, funds are budgeted to plan for the rehabilitation of the two deteriorating concrete piers within the footprint of U.S. Route 23 and to repair the two piers possibly in 2020.

Pictured is the Springfield Branch U.S. 23 Bridge (pedestrian only) with Ohio Wesleyan University’s Selby Stadium visible in the background. In the proposed City of Delaware’s 2019-2023 Capital Improvement Plan, funds are budgeted to plan for the rehabilitation of the two deteriorating concrete piers within the footprint of U.S. Route 23 and to repair the two piers possibly in 2020.


Joshua Keeran | The Gazette

The City of Delaware’s 2019-2023 Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) has been proposed and is currently being discussed among members of City Council. At Monday’s meeting, the ordinance to adopt the CIP was read for the third time. Adoption of the plan is expected to be done at the Oct. 8 meeting.

The plan highlights the city’s capital improvement general fund balances over the next five years, while also detailing a range of projects that could be completed in that time span.

A summary of the capital improvement general fund shows expected funds available for capital improvements after including revenues and subtracting the city’s debts to be $2,317,104 in 2019, $1,296,221 in 2020, $1,125,877 in 2021, $1,315,056 in 2022 and $1,740,544 in 2023.

Expenditures by the city for capital improvement, according to the CIP, are projected to total $2,717,538 in 2019, $1,977,128 in 2020, $1,721,490 in 2021, $1,801,110 in 2022 and $2,349,207 in 2023. Expenditure categories include airport, street and park improvements, as well as equipment replacement, technology improvements, and building and sidewalk maintenance.

Under the plan, $3,466,120 would be spent on street improvements over the five years, with $3,250,000 being spent on equipment replacement such as replacing one fire truck in each year of the plan, at a cost of $170,000 per truck, and replacing various maintenance and repair machinery.

Discussed further in the street improvements section of the plan is the much-anticipated reconstruction of The Point that would relieve much of the congestion along U.S. Route 36 and state Route 37 by adding a lane on both sides of the road. Extensive reconstruction of the Norfolk Southern Railroad bridge would also be done.

The total cost of The Point project is estimated to be $25.2 million. The city has secured funding at both the state and federal levels that would cover 75 percent of the project, leaving the city with $6.4 million in local funding to contribute. The city’s report states it will continue to pursue additional grant money and funding opportunities to lower the city’s needed contributions.

According to the report, the project is currently in the survey phase of both the roadway and the railway above. Progress for the remainder of 2018 is expected to include “advancement in the preliminary design, alternatives analysis, stakeholder meetings and public involvement.” Public involvement will include an open house and public hearing later this year. Construction is not expected to begin before 2022.

Improvements to East William Street are also detailed in the report. The improvements include widening the street to include a center turn lane from Potter Street to just east of Foley Avenue, while enlarging the intersection of William and Lake streets. At an estimated total cost of $4.25 million, which is subject to increase, most of the project will be paid for through federal funding. The city will chip in $600,000, although, again, the city will look to secure additional funds to lower that number.

It is anticipated construction would begin in spring of 2019 and would only take one construction season to complete.

Another project included in the CIP is the repairing of the Springfield Branch pedestrian bridge that extends over U.S. Route 23, the Olentangy River and River Street. The two cement piers on U.S. 23 are deteriorating and repairs are needed to prevent further deterioration and concrete from the bridge falling onto U.S. 23.

The report estimates the repairs would cost around $150,000, but notes a more accurate estimate would be available early next year. The city is also weighing the cost-effectiveness of the repairs against replacing the entire bridge with a new structure that would be similar to the pedestrian bridge that was constructed in Orange Township.

The full report, which will be finalized ahead of the Oct. 8 meeting, can be read by accessing the agenda for the Sept. 10 city council meeting, which can be found on the city council page under the departments and services tab on the city’s website.

Pictured is the Springfield Branch U.S. 23 Bridge (pedestrian only) with Ohio Wesleyan University’s Selby Stadium visible in the background. In the proposed City of Delaware’s 2019-2023 Capital Improvement Plan, funds are budgeted to plan for the rehabilitation of the two deteriorating concrete piers within the footprint of U.S. Route 23 and to repair the two piers possibly in 2020.
https://www.delgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/40/2018/09/web1_Bridge2.jpgPictured is the Springfield Branch U.S. 23 Bridge (pedestrian only) with Ohio Wesleyan University’s Selby Stadium visible in the background. In the proposed City of Delaware’s 2019-2023 Capital Improvement Plan, funds are budgeted to plan for the rehabilitation of the two deteriorating concrete piers within the footprint of U.S. Route 23 and to repair the two piers possibly in 2020. Joshua Keeran | The Gazette
Plan highlights several infrastructure projects

By Dillon Davis

cdavis@aimmediamidwest.com

Reach Dillon Davis at 740-413-0904. Follow him on Twitter @ddavis_gazette.

Reach Dillon Davis at 740-413-0904. Follow him on Twitter @ddavis_gazette.