Delaware recognizes National Preparedness Month


National Preparedness Month was recognized Monday at the Delaware City Council meeting.

The meeting began with an invocation by Police Chaplain Dan Maurer that reflected on the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, as well as the recent hurricanes which have hit the United States.

Following cursory business, Mayor Carolyn Kay Riggle read a proclamation to Police Chief Bruce Pijanowski and Fire Chief John Donahue.

The city’s proclamation encouraged citizens to learn to prepare for all types of emergencies, “from potential terrorist attacks to natural disasters,” Riggle said.

“Emergency preparedness is a responsibility of every resident, where we all take a few simple steps to make preparedness a priority in our community,” Riggle continued. “I call upon all people in the City of Delaware to engage in preparedness actions at home, work, school and place of worship.”

Donahue said Sept. 11 is a somber day as a result of the terrorist attacks; and a similar tragedy is currently playing out in Florida with Hurricane Irma, as well as in Texas with Hurricane Harvey.

“There’s a definite need for all of us to be prepared,” Donahue said to a packed audience in City Hall’s Council Chambers. “There are times we think, it won’t impact us. But if we look around the room today, we all know someone who’s been impacted by the storms the past three weeks. Nine years ago, we had Hurricane Ike come through our city during fair week. It can happen here, and it will happen here again.”

Pijanowski said preparedness starts with the individual “knowing what their preparedness plan is, then what their family’s preparedness plan is, then their neighbor’s, then their community and their city. We can’t be successful unless individuals are successful at saving themselves.”

President Donald J. Trump proclaimed September 2017 as National Preparedness Month.

“We bring attention to the importance of readying ourselves for disasters, both natural and man-made,” reads the national proclamation. “We also take this time to extend our sincerest gratitude to first responders, who selflessly run toward danger to keep our Nation and its people safe. We vow to support them and provide the tools they need to save lives.”

The proclamation goes on to state that Americans can start today to improve their readiness in case of disaster.

“The first steps include making and practicing a family emergency response plan, creating an emergency supply kit, and signing up for emergency alerts,” said the White House-issued proclamation. “Together, we will create a stronger and safer Nation.”

The Federal Emergency Management Association’s current preparedness campaign slogan is “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. YOU CAN.”

For more information, visit https://www.ready.gov/september.

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Mayor Carolyn Kay Riggle, left, reads a proclamation to Police Chief Bruce Pijanowski and Fire Chief John Donahue at the Delaware City Council meeting on Monday. September is National Preparedness Month.
http://www.delgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/40/2017/09/web1_DSCF9694.jpgMayor Carolyn Kay Riggle, left, reads a proclamation to Police Chief Bruce Pijanowski and Fire Chief John Donahue at the Delaware City Council meeting on Monday. September is National Preparedness Month. Gary Budzak | The Gazette

By Gary Budzak

gbudzak@aimmediamidwest.com