Carlisle Elementary students celebrate Leap Day


Kason Powers, a second-grader in Sara Livingston’s Carlisle Elementary School class, colors a frog Monday morning during a special lesson about Leap Day. Livingston explained to students that each year technically lasts 365 days and six hours, and Feb. 29 is added to the calendar every four years to consolidate all the left-over time. Livingston had students write about which year the next Leap Year will be and how old they will be when it occurs.

Kason Powers, a second-grader in Sara Livingston’s Carlisle Elementary School class, colors a frog Monday morning during a special lesson about Leap Day. Livingston explained to students that each year technically lasts 365 days and six hours, and Feb. 29 is added to the calendar every four years to consolidate all the left-over time. Livingston had students write about which year the next Leap Year will be and how old they will be when it occurs.


Kason Powers, a second-grader in Sara Livingston’s Carlisle Elementary School class, colors a frog Monday morning during a special lesson about Leap Day. Livingston explained to students that each year technically lasts 365 days and six hours, and Feb. 29 is added to the calendar every four years to consolidate all the left-over time. Livingston had students write about which year the next Leap Year will be and how old they will be when it occurs.

Kason Powers, a second-grader in Sara Livingston’s Carlisle Elementary School class, colors a frog Monday morning during a special lesson about Leap Day. Livingston explained to students that each year technically lasts 365 days and six hours, and Feb. 29 is added to the calendar every four years to consolidate all the left-over time. Livingston had students write about which year the next Leap Year will be and how old they will be when it occurs.
http://aimmedianetwork.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/40/2016/03/web1_Leap-Day-Photo.jpgKason Powers, a second-grader in Sara Livingston’s Carlisle Elementary School class, colors a frog Monday morning during a special lesson about Leap Day. Livingston explained to students that each year technically lasts 365 days and six hours, and Feb. 29 is added to the calendar every four years to consolidate all the left-over time. Livingston had students write about which year the next Leap Year will be and how old they will be when it occurs.