Rescues looking for forever homes


By D. Anthony Botkin - abotkin@aimmediamidwest.com



Braxton Arms, 2, couldn’t pass by Cash, a rescued canine, without stopping to give him a little attention. Alan Dennis, Braxton’s uncle, said if he didn’t already have five Great Danes at home, he might have been tempted to adopt Cash.

Braxton Arms, 2, couldn’t pass by Cash, a rescued canine, without stopping to give him a little attention. Alan Dennis, Braxton’s uncle, said if he didn’t already have five Great Danes at home, he might have been tempted to adopt Cash.


D. Anthony Botkin | The Gazette

Through social media, word of mouth and by holding events, Canine Collective Dog Rescue’s mission is to “provide rescued dogs another chance to find their forever homes.” Saturday, the mostly volunteer-run organization and 501(c)3 nonprofit charity, held one of its events at the 2018 Delaware County Fair.

“We rescue from owner surrenders and from southern kill shelters,” said Phil Keay, a volunteer with Canine Collective. “Canine Collective is an all-breed, no-kill, dog rescue. We use Facebook a lot, Instagram, adoption events, andwe do Pet Smart every week on Saturday 12 to 3 p.m. on Sawmill Road, north of Dublin.”

Keay said the kennel, located at 11144 U.S. Route 42, Plain City, “holds around 50 to 60 dogs at one time” and is open to the public Saturdays and Sundays from 1-4 p.m.

“We have a lot of visitors,” he said.

Keay added it’s no secret that a lot of dogs migrate north to be adopted. He said that most of the dogs the group rescues come to the kennel from Kentucky.

“We then adopt them out throughout central Ohio,” he said. “They have a lot tougher job adopting dogs out in the south, because there are a lot more dogs being handed over there.”

Vivian Hammitt, also a volunteer with the kennel, said people transport dogs up from the south every weekend to the rescue kennels in Ohio.

“They’re usually on a kill list when we get them,” she said. “They’re overwhelmed down there, because they are small, rural shelters.”

Keay said the group didn’t allow adoptions at the fairgrounds on Saturday because of its approval process. He said events were about getting the group’s name out.

Keay added that in the summer, Canine Collective averages between 40 to 50 adoptions a month, which drops to about 20 to 25 in the winter.

If someone wants to adopt a dog, Phil suggests going online to https://caninecollective.org/, work through the approval process, and pick the dog up at the kennel. If a family already has a dog, they can take it to the kennel and do a meet and greet with the prospective new pet.

All the dogs have been neutered or spayed and microchipped.

Keay and Hammitt have each been volunteers with Canine Collective Dog Rescue for three years.

For more information on adopting a rescue dog, or to donate or volunteer, visit https://caninecollective.org/.

Braxton Arms, 2, couldn’t pass by Cash, a rescued canine, without stopping to give him a little attention. Alan Dennis, Braxton’s uncle, said if he didn’t already have five Great Danes at home, he might have been tempted to adopt Cash.
https://www.delgazette.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/40/2018/09/web1_DSC_4095-copy.jpgBraxton Arms, 2, couldn’t pass by Cash, a rescued canine, without stopping to give him a little attention. Alan Dennis, Braxton’s uncle, said if he didn’t already have five Great Danes at home, he might have been tempted to adopt Cash. D. Anthony Botkin | The Gazette

By D. Anthony Botkin

abotkin@aimmediamidwest.com

Contact D. Anthony Botkin at 740-413-0902. Follow him on Twitter @dabotkin.

Contact D. Anthony Botkin at 740-413-0902. Follow him on Twitter @dabotkin.